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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
a problem for john boehner's caucus, because john boehner sent a letter to the president this week with his own plan, which advocates what just might be the least popular policy in american politics. okay, maybe that's hyperbole. but just be a tiny bit, i mean, mandatory gay marriage, in which every single married straight person had to immediately divorce their spouse, and accept a state-assigned same-gender spouse to replace them would probably be more popular than what john boehner proposed this week. what john boehner is advocating is making medicare available to fewer americans. as it happens, there is brand-new polling out today on how americans feel about the idea of congress using these deficit negotiations to make cuts to medicare. 79% of americans say they do not want congress to touch medicare in these deficit negotiations. 79%. if you want to get specific about john boehner's proposal, what he wants to do to medicare is to raise the eligibility age from 65 to 67. and as it turns out, there is also recent polling on that specific proposal. and it is also super unpopular. look at
as speaker boehner doesn't require there be a majority of his majority to pass that bill, i think we can get that done. i have a sense that's kind of a way we're moving. as to spending, and some of the other matters, i think that's going to be something where the can's kicked down the road in to next year. >> that seems to be the common theme today. i've watched your colleagues on our air and read comments in different newspapers. it seems that that's where we are right now. get this issue of the tax cuts complete so that the american people will have at least some comfort and then as you pointed out, kick the can down the road. i have heard people say this is groundhog day. this is the same thing over and over again. it seems that -- this seems to be a repeat performance. >> well, i think due to a certain extent that's true and happening -- will be happening at the beginning of a session. and we're going to about 85 or 86 new members here, a few more democrats and hopefully a refreshed membership that will actually look to do this. now, you talked about the schedule and actually next year's
cliff blame game on friday. the rhetoric heats up as the clock winds down. today house speaker boehner and nancy pelosi held duelling news conferences slamming the other side for not taking the looming crisis seriously. >> this isn't a progress report, because there's no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> we've had time. the president has given the republicans flexibility to come up with a credible, specific plan. what they offered in return was an empty letter lacking in specifics. >> meanwhile, vice president biden is having lunch with several middle class americans who would see their income taxes go up if the tax cuts are not extended. all of this comes as the first jobs report since the election exceeded expectations. the u.s. economy added some 146,000 jobs last month. that was enough it to drive the unemployment rate down to 7.7%. joining me to talk about all of it, florida congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz and she chairs the democratic national committee. goo
. interesting. president obama and speaker boehner. nobody else. with 24 days before a year-end deadline, "the new york times" says boehner made the request to clear the negotiation room going forward, leaving it up to himself and the president to reach a deal to avoid automatic tax hikes and deep spending cuts. and while the two men may be negotiating privately, yesterday the president took his message to the public, visiting a local virginia family as a part of his my2k social media campaign, sitting around the kitchen table. he told the family he was optimistic. >> the message that i think we all want to send to members of congress is, this is a solvable problem. the senate has already passed a bill that would make sure the middle-class taxes don't go up next year by a single dime. just to be clear, i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> what great news, i think. don't you think so
with the president, house speaker john boehner says the white house is stone walling. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house is has wasted another week. >> reporter: this morning in his weekly address, president obama is holding a hard line on raising rates for the wealthy. >> and if we're serious about protecting middle-class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> reporter: but how much higher could be the key. the top tax rate is set to rise from 35% to 39.6% on january 1st. when asked if a middle ground could be found, both boehner and biden showed some wiggle room. >> the top brackets have to go up. it's not a negotiable issue. theoretically we can negotiate how far up. >> reporter: at another local restaurant, the owner has seen enough of washington gridlock. >> i wish those lawmakers would get their [ bleep ] together and get it done and try to help everybody. it would be good if they could do it before the holidays are over
with raising tax rates. but at the end of the day, it only matters what john boehner can get the house republicans to accept. last week the speaker indicated he might be okay with raising rates, he backtracked a few hours later. what's the appetite right now for raising those rates? is that something that's going to be an easier sell for john boehner than a lot of folks think? >> i don't necessarily think so. i think until we see guys like say jason chafitz of utah or tim scott of south carolina start speaking out about the possibility of extending taxes for the middle class and going up, i don't think it can happen, necessarily. you know, and they run the risk potentially of running into a situation like we did in 2008. where a deal is put together on t.a.r.p. back then remember it was voted on, voted down, they had to go back and do it again. that if the speaker is not careful and doesn't keep his caucus in the loop, they could potentially turn around and say no, this isn't what we wanted. you never consulted us, anyway, why would we vote for something like this? a lot of them could
. >> that was house speaker, john boehner, saying the same thing he has been saying for weeks and weeks. here we are, another week closer to that january 1st deadline and washington is stuck in the same political feedback loop with the speaker playing to the podium and the president playing to the people. here is president on thursday in a made for television photo op with that average middle class family in virginia. it is down to these two men. at the speaker's request, the deal will be hammered out without senate lead derts or congresswoman pelosi. they are fighting to try to reach a deal. i'm interested in this family that the president went and sat with, because the santana and massenberg family is an intergenerational family. they are saying it takes all four of us to raise the kids, all four of us to pay the bills. not only have we moved beyond a time when one income could support an american family. we are now at a point where four working adults are required. isn't this sort of the bigger issue than where we are on the fiscal cliff. >> if you are a family values person, how can you possibly
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)